Moneybookers (Skrill) and Gambling Sites

Originally published in the BetClub forum.

Post by Corner 8th November 2010

A very interesting report from Bookmakersreview confirms the impression that Moneybookers do not care whether the gambling sites they promote are safe or not. You have been warned.

Report from 30 October 2010 on Bookmakersreview:

Moneybookers identity crisis

A customer of the popular ewallet and leading igaming payment provider showed BMR an email in which a VIP manager told a customer, that complained about not getting paid from a bookmaker, that Moneybookers is no longer working with the betting site and if a player is owed money he needs to bring up the problem directly with the bookmaker. In another case, an online bettor that complained with Moneybookers about a bookmaker not paying, was told from a CS representative that Moneybookers job is only to transfer money from person A to person B.

Personally we would have nothing to say if Moneybookers limited its activities to payment services.

But since Moneybookers actively promotes gambling sites, often with bonuses that no other gambling portal has, meaning that they must have agreed special affiliate deals with the casino or sports betting site, Moneybookers job ceases to be only to transfer money from A to B.

It is bad enough that as a payment provider they accept every gambling site that applies as a merchant, with no one turned down whatsoever, but when Moneybookers adds a betting site to its igaming promotions page, that’s a vote of confidence (or at least that’s how players see it), so the least Moneybookers should do is to assist players who have problems with their igaming partners.

Is it too much to expect that a payment provider steps up when the sites it promoted until a hour before, stop paying their players?

Online bettors and customers of Moneybookers who have lost money with any of the bookmakers promoted by the ewallet should contact the FSA and the UK Gambling Commission as they probably are the only ones who can tell Moneybookers to stop promoting gambling sites that operate unlicensed or from countries not in the UKGC white list.

And before Moneybookers IPO and listing on the London stock market, their advisors should inform the company that cross-selling should be synonym with providing customers more valuable services, not sell the customers out and then abandon them.

 

Post by Corner, 4th January 2011

A reminder to be careful with bookies affiliated to Moneybookers.

As part of my routine checks I look at the gambling promotions available via Moneybookers. While some of their offers are perfectly reasonable (they currently have links to Legends and 5dimes), others are not so good. At the moment they are linking to 2 bookies I would not touch with a bargepole:

Betus – on the red list for multiple slow pays, rated D+ at SBR and 1 at Bookmakersreview

Sportsbook.com – on the red list as part of Jazette enterprises, notorious for slow pays and account confiscations. SBR D-, BR 1.

Please, please don’t be tempted to sign up to these bookies, and don’t be lulled into a false sense of security because they are affiliated to Moneybookers.

 

Post by aiche 21st February 2011

MoneyBookers – A costly experience

For the first time ever for me, I used MoneyBookers to deposit with a bookie and withdraw back to MoneyBookers.

So far, every transaction via MoneyBookers has incurred charges.

My initial £100 deposit cost me £1.90 extra in commission.

Unfortunately, I hit winners with SportsBet the Australian bookie (with whom I have had no problems at all), and eventually withdrew $652.

MoneyBookers advised me via e-mail that $652 had arrived in my MoneyBookers account.

652 Aussie dollars converted to £407.38 when I made my withdrawal, and today when it appeared in my MoneyBookers account, it should have converted to £406.41.

MoneyBookers only added £396.58 to my account, with no indication of any transaction charges.

That leaves me a tenner or so out of pocket on the currency conversion.

On top of that, there will be more charges to pay when I withdraw from MoneyBookers back to my bank account.

A bit of commission here and there would have been acceptable, but losing a tenner via a currency conversion is going too far.

In future, I will avoid using MoneyBookers.

I feel somewhat ripped off.

 

Post by Corner 21st February 2011

Like all banks, Moneybookers do charge currency conversion fees. Unfortunately this can’t be avoided.

To withdraw from Moneybookers without fees, you can deposit the money into Betfair. As long as you have plenty of net deposits by another method such as a card, you will then be able to withdraw from Betfair via your card. However if you do not have net deposits, if you want to withdraw the money you will have to do it into Moneybookers.

Unlike most bookies, Betfair do not mind you having more than one deposit method, as long as you stick to their rule that you can’t withdraw more than you have deposited by any one method until you have cleared any net deposits by all other methods.

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